A final guide to get full screen and slide-QWERTY auto-rotate supported applications

Lots of phones in present days boast a slide-out QWERTY keyboard with touch-sensitive screen. The Java applications running on those phones, on sliding out the keyboard, don’t turn into landscape mode. It can often be observed that twenty per cent of the screen area gets covered by on-screen navigation buttons. After searching for days on this topic, I’ve finally come up with solution.

Download the application and open the .JAR file with WinRAR. Navigate to META-INF folder and open MANIFEST.MF file with notepad. At the very end of that file add the lines declared below:

X-Pax-Keyboard: Qwerty
X-Pax-TextInput-Hidden: true
MIDlet-Touch-Support: TRUE
MIDlet-ScreenMode: ROTATE

Save it and WinRAR will ask you for confirmation, ahead you are intelligent enough what to do.

Please ask any questions in comments and share your experiences.

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Running a code on separate thread or Background Worker | VB.NET

A little background:

When a hard task comes for a VB.NET application, for example Downloading data off Internet, copying large files, etc.. The application hangs over there without making use of more threads. This hanging problem can be solved to a great extent by using the .NET component called ‘BackgroundWorker’.

The little example below will show you how to use it.

  • Drag ‘BackgroundWorker’ from toolbox.
  • Drag a button

Double click on form and type:

Public Shared Sub Thread()
Dim dlURL As String
dlURL = http://example.com/filename.png”

Dim savingpath As String
savingpath = My.Computer.FileSystem.CurrentDirectory.ToString  + “file.png”)

My.Computer.Network.DownloadFile(dlURL, savingpath)
End Sub

Now double click on button and type

BackgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync()

What will this example do?

Hmm, it will download the specified file and you will be able to clearly observe that the application does not hang. Run this application and check Network Statistics, the load will be ‘maximum’.

Making a System Restore programmatically | VB.NET

System Restore is a component of Microsoft’s Windows Me, Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7, but not Windows 2000 operating systems that allows for the rolling back of system files, registry keys, installed programs, etc., to a previous state in the event of system malfunction or failure.

System Restore backs up system files of certain extensions (.exe, .dll, etc.) and saves them for later recovery and use. It also backs up the registry and most drivers.

The following resources are backed up:

  • Registry.
  • Files in the Windows File Protection (Dllcache) folder.
  • Local user profile.
  • COM+ and WMI Databases.
  • IIS Metabase.
  • Specific file types monitored.

System restores are normally created when software is installed using the Windows Installer, when Windows update installs a new update and there are so many other conditions. Don’t you think it must be vital function clipped with your software? Well, I dare say it must be! So, get the source code from below, and just do it.

Please note that this source code has been provided for Visual Basic .NET, which natively works with Microsoft Visual Basic 2008 and 2010 (including express editions).

Public Shared Sub RestorePoint()

‘Pointing to system restore

Dim restPoint = GetObject(“winmgmts:\.rootdefault:Systemrestore”)

If restPoint IsNot Nothing Then

‘Checking if its created successfully or not ‘Name of restore

If restPoint.CreateRestorePoint(“System Restore Test”, 0, 100) = 0 Then

Else

‘Error message in the case of failure

MsgBox(“Operation failed, but you can still continue!”, MsgBoxStyle.Exclamation, “Ooops!”)

End If

End If

End Sub

You must run this code in a seperate thread so that your software’s performance may not go negative. The tutorial for it goes here: https://hattedgeek.wordpress.com/2011/05/19/running-a-code-on-seperate-thread-or-background-worker-vb-net

This article is available as PDF.

This article is also available as PDF. You can download it from here (mirror: passechambre)

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